Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 Review

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds

The Revolution has been less than impressed with Johns’ interpretation and handling of the Legion of Super Heroes ever since their story arc over in Action Comics. I have never gotten the impression that Johns likes much less understands the Legion of Super Heroes. And Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds is only bolstering my aforementioned opinion of Johns. Hopefully, Johns will actually focus on the Legion in Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 and let them take the spotlight in this issue. Let’s go ahead and hit this review.

Creative Team

Writer: Geoff Johns
Pencils: George Perez
Inks: Scott Knoblish

Story Rating: 6 Night Girls out of 10
Art Rating: 10 Night Girls out of 10
Overall Rating: 8 Night Girls out of 10

Synopsis: We begin on Oa with Mon-El and Shadow Lass pleading for Sodam Yat to help them against Superboy-Prime. Sodam goes on about how Rond Vidar was the last of the Green Lanterns and that at least Yat no longer has to bury another Lantern. Mon-El mentions that Yat could recruit new Lanterns. Yat replies that the only Lantern worthy of picking new recruits was Mogo and that he died a month ago. Yat says that he has done too many things that have stained his soul that prevents him from picking new recruits.

Yat rambles on about how his immortality as the final Guardian has allowed him to watch all the Lanterns die. That Yat has watched everyone he cares about die. Yat says that he has been alone for centuries. Yat says that Mon-El would not understand. Mon-El retorts that he actually totally understands. That he was trapped in the Phantom Zone for a thousand years and watched time pass as family and friends died.

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Mon-El says that Yat is living in fear. That Green Lanterns are supposed to be without fear. Yat replies that Green Lanterns are not without fear. That they simply can overcome fear just like Mon-El did. Yat then says that the Legionnaires are correct. That Yat has been afraid of himself.

Yat then says the Green Lantern Oath and powers up the ten power rings on his fingers. Yat says that he will help the Legion in their war with Superboy-Prime. Yat then says “The Green Lantern Corps shall live again!” (Huh, I feel like I am reading a Blackest Night tie-in issue.)

We cut to Earth where the Pre-Crisis Legion from the Action Comics story arc is battling with the Superboy-Prime and the Legion of Super-Villains. It appears that Invisible Kid (The Jacques Foccart version) gets killed.

Superman streaks in and blasts into Superboy-Prime and carries him far away from the fight scene. Superman places his hand over Prime’s eyes. Superman calls Superboy-Prime “Clark.” This enrages Superboy-Prime who hates that “geek” name. Superman asks Prime if he remembers his wonderful adoptive parents. If Prime remembers his girlfriend Laurie.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 2Prime retorts that on his world, Superman’s world was just a fantasy found in comic books. That Prime loved Superman’s world so much that Prime allowed his world of Earth-Prime to be sacrificed to save Superman’s Earth. Superman asks Prime what Laurie would say if she knew all that Prime had done. Prime screams for Superman not to mention Laurie’s name. Prime then uses his heat vision to blast a huge hole in Superman’s hand. Prime then uses his super-breath to freeze Superman and then Prime punches Superman.

We cut back to the Legion of Super Heroes still brawling with the Legion of Super-Villains. The Legion is badly outnumbered by the villains. We see Earth-Man and the Justice League attacking the United Planets building. Karate Kid then gets killed by Radiation Roy. (Yeah, that joke stopped being funny the first time that Giffen did it.) A few Legionnaires then appear on the scene and starts brawling with Earth-Man and the Justice League. We get plenty more of that wildly interesting mind numbingly dull xenophobic dialogue from Earth-Man during this fight scene.

The Legionnaires begin to get overwhelmed by the more numerous Legion of Super Villains. The Legionnaires wonder aloud where Brainiac 5 is and what his contingency plan was supposed to be. Prime then appears back at the fight scene. Prime then destroys the giant statues of the original Legionnaires.

Superman then arrives back at the fight scene. Superman says that he brought some help with him. Suddenly, we see the Zero Hour Legion and the current Legion arriving at the fight scene. (Oh look, here comes the cannon-fodder.)

The Legionnaires enjoy fighting aside their duplicate versions. Ultra Boy is particularly excited with the prospect of partying with three Phantom Girls. The tide turns with the reinforcements on the scene and the Legionnaires kicks ass on the villains.

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Brainiac 5 then tells Cosmic Boy and Lightning Lad that the Legions from the Multiverse are just stage one of this three stage plan. The second stage entails all the lightning wielders of the Legion to come to the clubhouse and activate the lightning rod from the Lightning Sage in the JLA/JSA crossover. Gates teleports onto the scene and then teleports the Lightning Lads back to the clubhouse.

Cosmic Boy and Saturn Girl then wonder what the third stage of Brainiac 5’s plan is. We cut to Wildfire, Dawnstar and Polar Boy in Smallville back when Clark was still Superboy. We see the “Welcome to Smallville: Home of the ‘Super-Boy’” sign. They fly over to Lex Luthor’s house where Lex’s dad is being verbally abusive towards Lex. Lex storms to his “lab” located in the barn next to the house. The Legionnaires enter Lex’s bedroom. Polar Boy says that this is a historic day. That this is the day Lex begins to lose his hair.

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We cut back to the three Brainiac 5’s and all of the Lightning Lads, Lightning Lasses and the one Light Lass back at the clubhouse. Brainiac uses the “living lightning rod” from the Lightning Saga story arc to amplify the powers of the Zero Hour Garth (Live Wire) who is stuck in Element Lad’s body. This enables Live Wire to transform himself into whatever he wishes. Suddenly, Live Wire turns back to his normal self. (But oddly still with his mechanical arm. If Live Wire could transform himself into whatever he wishes then why wouldn’t he have restored his arm back to normal in the process?)

X-S tells Brainiac 5 that she has a strange sense of déjà-vu. Brainy responds that this is because X-S was not born on the recently destroyed Earth-247. That X-S was born on this present Earth (New Earth), which is the keystone of the Multiverse. Brainiac 5 explains how Barry Allen and Iris lived in their time period and started a family. That Barry’s children were the Tornado Twins. Brainy reveals that X-S is a part of the Flash family. (Of course. Why wouldn’t the Flash franchise now horn in on the Legion’s supposed “seminal” mini-series.)

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 5

Evidently, Professor Zoom tried to stop the marriage of X-S’s cousin’s parents Don Allen and Meloni Thawne. With their families in tow, the Tornado Twins sought refuge on a parallel world. But, Zoom sabotaged the time treadmill that the Tornado Twins used. The explosion tore open the Multiverse. The Legion of Three Worlds were pulled together from their various Earths.

After the Legion battled back Zoom and his 25th century speed soldiers the three Legions were stranded on an unknown Earth. The three Brainiac 5’s then designed Starman’s costume with a map of the Multiverse on it. That Starman was able to use his powers to open black holes and return the three Legions to their proper Earths. However, the Tornado Twins and their families stayed hidden on Earth-247. The Tornado Twins died shortly thereafter; however, X-S and her cousin, Bart Allen, were reunited with their grandmother Iris Allen.

The Brainiac 5 from the current Legion in the just cancelled Legion of Super Heroes title states that the Brainiac 5 from Johns’ Pre-Crisis Legion must be wrong. The Brainiac 5 from the current Legion says that they interacted with Supergirl from New Earth. Brainiac 5 from Johns’ Pre-Crisis Legion says that sometimes during time travel that a person can shift into the Multiverse. Evidently that is what happened to Supergirl.

Brainiac 5 tells X-S that bad things have happened to the Flash family and that she needs to help them. Brainy tells X-S to run as fast as she can on the cosmic treadmill.

We cut back to the brawl between the three Legions and the Legion of Super Villains. Several Legionnaires are teaming up against Prime in order to destroy his armor that protects him from red sunlight. Suddenly, a voice enters Prime’s head and tells him that he needs to go to the Legion clubhouse. That Prime need to stop the Legion from bringing “him” back.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 6Prime screams that he will not let them bring “him” back. Prime breaks free from the Legionnaires that were attacking him. However, Prime’s armor is destroyed in the process. Sun Boy (I think this is the Post-Zero Hour version) attacks Prime. Prime then kills the Post-Zero Hour Sun Boy.

We cut to the Pre-Crisis Sun Boy alone in his dark apartment clutching his chest and hanging his head down. We cut back to Prime battling the Legionnaires. Mon-El, Shadow Lass and Sodam Yat appear on the scene. Yat binds Prime with his power ring and tells Prime that he is under arrest. Two Shadow Lasses make shadows around Prime in order to drain the sunlight from Prime’s cells.

We slide back to the clubhouse where the Lightning Lads and the Lightning Lasses are all pouring their energy into the treadmill that X-S is running on. Light Lass uses her powers to make X-S lighter since the faster X-S runs the heavier she gets. We cut back to Superboy-Prime breaking free from Yat’s power ring. Prime races toward the clubhouse. We shift back to the clubhouse where the lightning rod from the Lightning Saga story arc begins to glow.

X-S says that she can hear the speed force talking to her. We hear a voice saying “That’s not the speed force, Jenni.” All the belts on the treadmill break and there is a huge explosion. Prime flying toward the lab. Prime rants “He is just a stupid kid. He does not matter!” We then see a the yellow lightning from the lightning rod take a human form. The form says “Hi guys! Man, do I feel better.”

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 7Brainiac 5 then tosses the figure a ring. The figure catches the ring and puts it on. The ring’s top opens up and out comes Kid Flash’s costume. We see Prime entering the lab and saying “Oh, no! Please, NO! Don’t be scared of him now!” We then see Bart Allen in his Kid Flash costume. Bart says “Boo!” and races toward Prime. End of issue.

Commentary

The Good: Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 is a tough title to grade. First, this title has nothing at all to do with Final Crisis and really should not even have “Final Crisis” in its title. Second, this title really does not have much to do with the Legion either. This title would be more fitting as a general DCU mini-series about the Green Lantern Corps and the Flash franchise set during the Legion’s era.

If I am grading this title strictly as a Legion title then this issue failed miserably and I would have given it 4 Night Girls out of 10. However, if this title was billed as a general DCU mini-series then I would have given this issue 8 Night Girls out of 10. So I went ahead and averaged the two scores and gave Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 a story rating of 6 Night Girls out of 10.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 9

Johns definitely dishes out gobs of fighting. If you like massive brawl scenes then you will love Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3. Johns crams more high energy fighting into this issue than I thought was possible. No matter what I may think about how Johns writes the Legion, one thing is for sure. Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 was definitely not a slow, boring or dull read!

Johns continues to show off his excellent plotting skills with this issue. And this is no surprise since strong plotting is one of Johns’ greatest strengths. Johns remains focused despite the various complex plotlines that he is delivering on this title. Each plotline naturally evolves and logically builds on the previous plotline.

What is particularly impressive is how Johns is able to choreograph the various scenes. It is not easy to juggle such a mind boggling massive cast of characters. Many high profile writes crumble under the stress of handling a roster of just six characters. And, without a doubt, it is a tough job for any writer to tackle managing a roster as large as the Legion of Super Heroes. But, to manage three Legion rosters at the same time plus the roster of the expanded Legion of Super Villains? That is a task that would make just about any comic book writer curl up in a fetal position and softly weep.

However, Johns shows no fear and impressively handles the giant cast of characters in this issue. Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 has a pretty good flow to the story considering the massive scope of the story and all the characters. Johns manages to smoothly transition from scene to scene. Johns also effectively conveys the chaotic nature and massive scale of this brawl between the Legion of Super Heroes and the Legion of Super Villains. There is no doubt that Johns has at least made Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds feel like an epic event.

As a Green Lantern Corps fan I enjoyed the opening scene of this issue. I like how Johns uses Yat’s character as the sole Guardian. This opening scene fits nicely into the wonderful and deep mythology that Johns has been creating over in Green Lantern. This scene is also dramatic without ever being too over the top or cheesy. The reader gets a good sense of the loss and loneliness that plagues Yat’s soul. And I loved the twist that Mon-El for this mission not because he is a Daxamite like Yat; but because Mon-El knows what it is like to live for a thousand years and see his family and friends die. That was very well done.

Johns continues to do his best to make Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds as new reader friendly as possible. The one page scene with Superman and Superboy-Prime was a smart way to give the back-story on Prime’s character and the role he played in Crisis on Infinite Earths. Also, Johns always makes an effort to have characters calling each other by name when they first appear on the scene so that new readers will know who is who. It is almost impossible to ask a writer to make the ridiculously convoluted Legion of Super Heroes continuity easily understandable to a reader who has not been following the Legion for thirty years. But, Johns does his best to do so and pulls it off in an admirable fashion.

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I must admit that as a life-long Legion fan, it was an absolute blast to see the three versions of The Legion of Super Heroes together. The double page splash shot of the two Legions arriving to the rescue. I never thought I would ever see all of these versions of the Legion of Super Heroes in the same story. Even though the Pre-Crisis Levitz Legion is by far and away my favorite version, I have to admit that it is nice to see all of the other versions as well.

And I am glad that DC has managed to make all of these versions of the Legion exist in the Multiverse. I always hated the total re-boots of the Legion that unceremoniously junked their continuity. As a continuity buff, I am glad to see that all of the previous versions of the Legion and their continuities are alive and well in the Multiverse.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 11It was certainly an oddly surreal feeling seeing the different versions of the same Legionnaire fighting next to each other. The best was the panel showing the three Ultra Boys celebrating in their own bombastic style. I also got a chuckle when the Pre-Crisis Ultra Boy first saw the three versions of Phantom Girl appear on the scene and comments “Three Phantom Girls? I hope I am not dreaming.” That was perfect.

It was great seeing Ferro Lad in action once again. I know that I am probably the only Ferro Lad fan in existence, but I have always liked his character. I was thrilled that Johns returned Live Wire back to his normal self rather than him being in Element Lad’s body.

I always hated the Progenitor plotline and I hated that Garth was killed and then brought back in Element Lad’s body. Of course, I must openly admit my bias concerning the DnA Legion since I found it largely nothing more than unreadable fan fiction. I am glad that Johns at least managed to clean up a little bit of DnA’s mess.

Johns sending Polar Boy, Wildfire and Dawny back to Smallville when Clark was Superboy is an interesting plotline. This definitely piques my curiosity. Johns clearly gives the reader a version of Smallville that is more Silver Age in feel. We see the welcome sign to Smallville that states that it is the home to the “Super-boy.” Johns also gives the reader a more Silver Age take on Lex Luthor’s origin.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 12The Silver Age Lex Luthor lost his hair due to Superboy using his super breath that inadvertently spilled chemicals which caused Lex’s hair to fall out. The Silver Age Lex also grew up in Smallville and had his own little lab in his barn. However, after Crisis on Infinite Earths, Lex’s origin was changed so that he grew up in poverty and a victim of child abuse in the Suicide Slum district of Metropolis. And Lex simply gradually lost his hair as he got older.

It appears that Johns is bringing back some of the Silver Age aspects to Lex Luthor’s origin. I am curious to find out why the day that Lex starts losing his hair is so historically important. I am not too sure where Johns is going with this third stage of Brainiac 5’s plan, but it looks pretty interesting.

Of course, there is always the possibility that the Legionnaires are getting a hair from Lex in order to have enough DNA for Brainiac 5 to re-clone Kon-El in order to help in their battle against Superboy-Prime.  And what character would have as much of a psychological impact on Prime than him having to face a good Superboy?

Johns does a fine job cleaning up the Legion’s continuity in the two page scene that addresses X-S’s origin as well as the previous meeting between the three Legions. Each version of the Legion is from a multiple Earth. It appears that the Pre-Crisis Legion that Johns used in the Action Comics story arc is the Legion from New Earth (Or are we supposed to be calling New Earth, Earth-0 now?) And that is exactly how it should be. The Pre-Crisis Legion is the first Legion and, in my opinion the best, so I am glad that it was chosen to be the Legion of New Earth’s future.

Johns also explains the previous meeting between the three Legions. Johns’ explanation nicely clarifies how Starman got his suit with the map of the Multiverse on it and how he was sent through time and ended up in the Kingdom Come Earth and then later with the JSA on New Earth. Johns also clears up the confusion of New Earth’s Supergirl spending time with the current version of the Legion. The explanation that during time travel a person can inadvertently cross into the Multiverse and end up on an alternate Earth is convenient but works within the logic of the science in the DCU.

Johns then focuses on his real love which is the Flash family. Johns nicely meshes X-S into the New Earth’s continuity and into the New Earth’s Flash family as well. By this I mean that I understand X-S has always been a part of the Flash family.  Johns just nicely folds her into the current continuity.  Personally, I could care less about X-S and found it odd that such a relatively minor and inconsequential Legionnaire managed to upstage long-time Legionnaires and grab the spotlight in this issue. However, given that Johns loves the Flash family it is understandable that he would want to elevate X-S’s position within the Legion.

Johns then ends Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 with a hell of an ending. We finally get the dramatic return of Bart Allen. This ending alone will make many DCU fans love this issue. And I expect that this ending will also be why Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 will be so popular and get so many positive reviews. Was Bart’s return painful predictable? Absolutely. We all knew that Bart was inside of the lightning rod back during the end of the Lightning Saga story arc. And we all saw this ending coming from a mile away. Still, despite being predictable, Johns delivered it in quite an enjoyable fashion.

I am glad that Bart is back. I hated it when DC killed Bart off. I thought it was a waste of a good character. I am even happier that Bart was brought back as a teen-ager and as Kid Flash. I strongly disliked DiDio’s decision to artificially age Bart at the end of Infinite Crisis and then make him the Flash. I thought that ruined Bart’s character. I liked Bart as Kid Flash and I thought he had a nice role carved out for himself within the DCU.

I actually enjoy Bart’s insertion into the Legion. And I think that this is where Bart belongs. Bart is from this time period so it would not be unusual for him to stay in the Legion’s era. And Bart is a better fit with the Legion and can grow and be his own man in the Legion compared to coming back to the present day DCU.

With the return of Barry Allen as the main Flash and with Wally still active as the Flash along with Jay Garrick still active as the Flash it is getting way too crowded with Flashes in the present day DCU. It would be better for Bart to carve out his own career in the future free from the long shadows of Barry, Jay and Wally.

George Perez’s artwork is simply gorgeous. Now, I have to openly disclose the fact that Perez is one of my all-time favorite artists. Having said that, I would recommend getting Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 just for Perez’s artwork alone. After the first couple of pages, I just tuned out Johns’ pedestrian Legion story and stared at Perez’s pretty pictures.

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What is particularly impressive is how well Perez choreographed the fight scenes. It is very difficult to draw an issue with such a huge roster of characters. And almost any artist currently working in comic books would be reduced to a drooling mess if they had to draw this many characters in one issue. However, Perez is the master of delivering detailed splash shots crammed full of numerous characters.

The Bad: Let’s address the most obvious problem with this title: the shipping schedule. It has been an absolute joke. Issue #1 came out in August 20, 2008. After a two month delay, issue #2 came out in October 15, 2008. Then we got nearly a four month delay before we finally got Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3. This is simply unacceptable work by DC.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 is not much of a Final Crisis tie-in issue. This is just a Final Crisis tie-in story in name only. And since Final Crisis ended before this issue came out I really do not see the point in DC forcing this to be a Final Crisis “tie-in.” This issue was more of a Blackest Night tie-in story than a Final Crisis tie-in. It is similar to how Final Crisis: Rage of the Red Lanterns had nothing at all to do with Final Crisis and was just a plug for the upcoming Blackest Night event.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 really does not have much to do with the Legion of Super Heroes franchise. Both the Green Lantern Corps and the Flash family play a far larger role in this story than the Legion itself. It appears that Legion of Three Worlds is less about the Legion and more a vehicle for Johns to further flesh out his two loves in the Green Lantern franchise and the Flash franchise.

And it is of no coincidence that The Flash: Rebirth comes out in April and Blackest Night gets kicked off in May. So it makes sense that Johns would use this Final Crisis tie-in story supposedly about the Legion to pimp his two big stories about the Flash and Green Lantern. And this is of no surprise and simply re-enforces my original opinion of Johns and his view of the Legion.

Johns is a Superman fan first and foremost. And any positive feelings Johns may have about the Legion are simply tangential feelings as he views the Legion as mere ancillary support characters to the Superman franchise. Never mind that the Legion stepped out from Superboy’s shadow nearly thirty years ago in Legion of Super Heroes #259. And since then the Legion has been allowed to grow on their own with their own identity and with their own history independent of that of Superman. However, Johns seems determined to relegate the Legion back to their status as second class citizens behind that of the great Superman.

Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 14I am definitely not at all surprised that Johns would allow the Green Lantern Corps and the Flash family to hi-jack the Legion’s supposedly “seminal” mini-series. Outside of Superman, Johns’ greatest loves in the DCU are Green Lantern and the Flash. So, it makes sense that Johns would turn this mini-series into a Superman, Green Lantern and Flash love-fest. The Legion are nothing but supporting characters to this story. And they provide Johns with ample cannon fodder.

And yes, I do believe that Johns views the various Legionnaires as nothing more than minor supporting characters that make for convenient “Joe expendables” in a big event. And the fact that Johns has triplicates of most of these expendable minor characters makes it even more convenient and tempting for him to slaughter some off during this story.

Johns is well aware of this weakness of his and is quite defensive about it. Johns even goes so far as to have the Brainiac 5 from the current Legion state that the Pre-Crisis Brainiac simply views the other two versions of the Legion as cannon fodder for the Pre-Crisis’ war with Superboy-Prime.

This was a preemptive strike by Johns against any fans who often decry him as viewing many characters as just cannon fodder for his big event stories. And this type of action is usually taken out of a defensive position that stems from a guilty conscious. Those who protest too quickly usually are guilty of what people are charging them with.

This is a standard tactic taken to try and rob the validity of a person’s criticism to Johns’ writing. By making this statement, Johns can dismiss any criticism as just typical fanboy reaction that he already so astutely predicted and inserted into his story. Still, this tactic is largely obvious and transparent and simply serves as evidence that Johns knows he often views certain characters as mere cannon fodder. And that is true in this case. I am sure that the few Legionnaire deaths that we got in this issue are just the beginning.

The dialogue in this issue was rather generic. This was not the best effort that we have gotten from Johns. Instead, Johns does just enough to move the story along but at no point does the dialogue ever rise above being average. The various Legionnaires have no personalities outside of a few of them being written as stereotypes. For example, Wildfire being an aggressive hot head, Brainy being cold and analytical, etc.

Having said that, it is only fair to point out that generic dialogue and a lack of character work is to be expected when a writer has to deal with such a large roster of characters. It is virtually impossible to ask Johns to deliver great dialogue and strong character work when he has so many characters that he has to juggle in a rather limited amount of time with just five issues dedicated to this story.

Even though I loved seeing all of the various Legionnaires back in action once again, I have to admit one personal pet peeve. Seeing Gates reminded me of how much I truly hated and despised his character. Gates is the only Legionnaire in all of the versions of the Legion that we have gotten that I can honestly say that I never liked for even a moment. I even enjoyed Quislet, Tellus, Sneckie and Monstress more than Gates. Wow, that is a who’s who of some pretty lame Legionnaires, huh?

I would say that Earth-Man is the most annoying super-villain ever, but Superboy-Prime is even more annoying. And it is of no surprise that both of them are Geoff Johns villains. Johns has many talents, but creating compelling, textured and nuanced villains certainly is not one of them. Honestly, no reader should ever have to be subjected to these two wretchedly pathetic villains in the same issue.

The scene with the Pre-Crisis Sun Boy in his darkened apartment was way too heavy handed. Johns has become too melodramatic with this plotline. I get it already. Dirk is going to have to reach down deep inside in order to find the ability to fire up his powers once again in order to render Superboy-Prime powerless by the end of this story. And I am sure that it will probably take the slaughtering of another Sun Boy to get him to hero up and rise to the occasion. And more likely than not, Dirk will end up sacrificing himself in this “heroic” and “climactic” moment that he defeats Prime.

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I am a bit unsure of why Superboy-Prime would be so terribly horrified and scared of Bart Allen returning. I know that Bart and Wally “defeated” Prime during Infinite Crisis. But, it obviously was not a permanent defeat and it took two Flashes to pull it off. I would understand Superboy-Prime having some concerns and reservations about Bart’s return. And I can understand that Prime would want to prevent it if he could. But, the outright over the top fear that we got from Superboy-Prime at the end of this issue seemed too much. It was as if Johns was going over board to try and emphasis Bart’s return.

Like I said before, as a Flash fan I liked this ending. However, as a Legion of Super Heroes fan I was completely unimpressed with the ending of Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3. I really did not need Johns too have Bart Allen riding to the Legion’s rescue in this story. I am as interested in that as I am in having Sodam Yat riding to the Legion’s rescue. I guess it would be too much to ask for to have the Legion rise to their own rescue and not depend on Superman, Kid Flash or Sodam Yat.

Overall: I think that non-Legion of Super-Heroes fans will really love Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3. For sure fans of the Flash family and fans of the Green Lantern Corps will absolutely love this issue. Superman fans will probably enjoy it as well since it appears that Johns is bringing back a decidedly Silver Age feel to Superman’s youth and Lex Luthor’s youth back in Smallville.

But, I am not too sure how much long-time Legion fans will enjoy this issue. I am getting the distinct feeling that this mini-series was not made with us in mind. Of course, one could argue that DC has not really cared about the long-time Legion fans in decades considering how poorly DC has handled the Legion franchise over the years.

In short, comic book readers who are new to the Legion and like action should definitely pick up Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3. I think those readers will find this issue a fun and exciting ride. And, of course, Flash and Green Lantern fans might want to think about picking up this issue as well.

4 Comments

  1. Someone on one of the boards speculated that this isn’t “the day Lex starts losing his hair” in terms of balding, but that it is a joke since they are taking a hair of his.

    If taking the hair actually was their purpose, the goal likely is DNA for cloning. A common theory is that Brainy wants to clone a new Kon-El as the last step in the psychological war on Prime. Don’t know if he has any way of getting Conner’s spirit or memories back, though.

    Is Starman’s mission supposed to tie in to this event, or do we know?

    In any case, brace yourself for a new threat to nudge the Legionnaires off of the page.

    (By the way, I’ll be pretty hacked off if no one bothers to tell Tim Drake that at least one of his friends is doing much better, now.)

  2. “Suddenly, a voice (That must be the Time Trapper’s voice.) enters Prime’s head and tells him that he needs to go to the Legion clubhouse.”

    No, it’s Saturn Queen.

    “What is particularly impressive is how Johns is able to choreograph the various scenes.”

    You simply do not write full script with George Perez. Johns did not choreograph anything. Perez did.

    “I know that I am probably the only Ferro Lad fan in existence, but I have always liked his character.”

    Nope. I’m a huge fan from when I read the original Shooter Sun-Eater story. 😉

    “I am not too sure where Johns is going with this third stage of Brainiac 5’s plan”

    He’s obviously going to create a new Kon-El and needs Luthor’s DNA.

    “Johns nicely meshes X-S into the New Earth’s continuity and into the New Earth’s Flash family as well.”

    She was always a part of the Flash family. Johns just shoehorned her into the new continuity.

    “We all knew that Bart was inside of the lightning rod back during the end of the Lightning Saga story arc.”

    Didio gave it away last summer… accidentally I might add.

    “What is particularly impressive is how well Perez choreographed the fight scenes.”

    See, that’s what I said up top…

    “Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 is not much of a Final Crisis tie-in issue.”

    I imagine the series will be. FC#7 has Superman and Braniac 5 with the Miracle Machine.

    “This issue was more of a Darkest Night tie-in story than a Final Crisis tie-in.”

    Pretty sure it’s Blackest Night.

    “Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3 really does not have much to do with the Legion of Super Heroes franchise.”

    I disagree completely with this statement.

    “And any positive feelings Johns may have about the Legion are simply tangential feelings as he views the Legion as mere ancillary support characters to the Superman franchise.”

    Perhaps, but I don’t think so.

    “I am definitely not at all surprised that Johns would allow the Green Lantern Corps and the Flash family to hi-jack the Legion’s supposedly “seminal” mini-series.”

    Green Lantern and Flash have always been a part of Legion mythos.

    “I would say that Earth-Man is the most annoying super-villain ever, but Superboy-Prime is even more annoying. And it is of no surprise that both of them are Geoff Johns villains.”

    They are written to be annoying. That’s the point.

    “Dirk is going to have to reach down deep inside in order to find the ability to fire up his powers once again in order to render Superboy-Prime powerless by the end of this story.”

    Yes, this is very much foreshadowed.

    “But, the outright over the top fear that we got from Superboy-Prime at the end of this issue seemed too much.”

    I agree with this assessment. I didn’t quite understand the total fear from Prime.

    “I am getting the distinct feeling that this mini-series was not made with us in mind.”

    Are you kidding me? No one but hardcore Legion fans would even understand what the hell is going on with this story.

  3. I am a long-time Legion fan (primarily Pre-Crisis Levitz Legion) and I really am enjoying this series. And I think your assessment is harsh. I give it a 9 out of 10 for story. (and a 10 for art – Yay Perez!)

    I do agree with the shipping schedule and the a little the Final Crisis tie-in, but to be honest, this feels more like Crisis than FC itself.

    And maybe there is a lot of focus on ‘tangential’ characters but Superman and X-S are part of a Legion, Yat is a logical extension of Rond Vidar and unanswered questions about the GLC in the 30th century.

    And the Legion was always about 30+ characters in most issues so this is classic especially with Johns tightening up some of the sloppiness in writing over the years. A Crisis indeed.

  4. As a veteran Legion follower, I am at a bit of a loss as to what the hell is happening to them. This issue is all over the place and doesn’t really relate to the Legion per se. Final issue #50 of LSH was absolutely abysmal (no comment from the Revolution, I note – too upset to write?) and the promises of continuity – Adventure, REBELS etc – just don’t hold water.

    All in all a poor time to be a LSH fan and this issue is symptomatic, I feel.

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